Multilingual Mondays

Consider, for a moment, this question: which media format has the most gimmicks? The answer is morning drive radio. (24-hour news is second.) (Neither of those are real facts.) The reason is that when you have to fill air or space every single day, gimmicks give you something that you can count on. It’s one less thing to think about. So, almost half-way through my month o’ blogging, I present to you my first gimmick: Multilingual Mondays!

Today I present links to videos or recordings of politicians telling people to shut up.

(1) Dominique de Villepin, former Prime Minister of France tells Jacques Chirac to “fermer sa guele” during a radio interview. Here’s a little article about the incident: http://podcast.blog.lemonde.fr/2011/06/13/la-gueule-de-johnny-a-villepin-via-chirac/

And here’s a remix of the clip from the same article:http://player.soundcloud.com/player.swf?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F16685720&La gueule by antoineblin

(2) In a tense moment at the 2007 Ibero-American Summit, Spanish President Jose Luis Zapatero and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez were arguing over an former President Aznar’s alleged insult of the Venezuelans at a parade in Spain. Zapatero is trying to talk and Chavez keeps interrupting him to demand respect for the Venezuelans. Spain’s revered King, Juan Carlos, leans forwards and demands of Chavez, “Why don’t you shut up?”. The incident immediately created a sensation in Spain. By the next day, you could buy shirts in the street with the slogan on it and you could use the recording as a ring tone. You can watch the whole Zapatero-Chavez exchange here. King Juan Carlos interjects at 0:38.

(3) Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari tells an unruly crowd to shut up while he’s giving a speech. He later had video of the incident make inaccesible in Pakistant. Here’s the article: http://blogs.abcnews.com/theworldnewser/2010/02/shut-up-pakistan-presidents-outburst-scrubbed-from-net.html . And here’s the video:

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One thought on “Multilingual Mondays

  1. Pingback: What Sacyega Taught Me about Kinyarwanda | Present Tense Memoir

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